Time-management

Best tips by Union students

  • Use lists. Keep a daily schedule.

Keeping a list helps me remember things. When I try to remember too many things at once, I tend to feel more stress. A list comes in handy when I don't feel like having to remember everything. It also prevents me from missing important meetings and deadlines. In addition, it's nice to cross something off, no matter how small.  [Kathy Klemm]

  • Use a planner

I don't think that I could function without a planner. Not only does it outline my schedule, but there is such a feeling of accomplishment when I can cross things off.  [Rebecca Butterfield]

  • Or find a system that works for you.

    In order to help me remember what I have to accomplish, I use “Post-It Notes.” For example, I'll write the different meetings, assignments, and tasks I need to accomplish on the “Post-It Notes,” stick them on my desk, and arrange them according to their priority. [Ryan Lee]
     

  • Do the most important things first.

A favorite quotation: “A man is truly rich if he has time to do what he wants to.”

Lately, it seems like the days fly by. Because time is becoming increasingly scarce, I usually do the most important things first. If possible I try to work ahead and accomplish things early so that I won't be stressed about a deadline. [Ryan Lee]

  • Establish a routine.

    What helped me the most was to get myself on a routine. To be able to get up at the same time each day (excluding weekends, of course) and eat meals around similar times, helps partition the day into more manageable chunks. Lectures and lab times essentially start the process for me. Once my class schedule is complete, I can fit everything else in-between. Overall, it helps me get the most out of my day. [Cregg Brown]