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People in the news 02 - Jan 2013


Bunkong Tuon, assistant professor of English, recently published an article on teaching the Viet Nam War in the peer-reviewed journal Pedagogy.

Jeffrey Corbin, assistant professor of biology, presented an invited poster at the American Geophysicist Union Annual Meeting in December. His poster, "When the circus comes to town: Countering campus presentations on climate denial" described the results of a survey that gauged the opinions of Union students with respect to climate change following the March 2012 visit by Christopher Monckton and counter-presentations by faculty and students. His results showed that the events tended to increase student acceptance of the reality of climate change, its risks and the role that humans play. Corbin recently summarized his poster at GarnetGoesGreen, U-Sustain's blog: http://garnetgoesgreen.blogspot.com/2013/01/countering-climate-denial-on-college.html

JillMarie Murphy, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Assistant Professor of English, was invited to give a lecture on her latest book, Monstrous Kinships: Realism and Attachment Theory in the Nineteenth- and Early Twentieth-Century Novel.
The book, by the University of Delaware Press, highlights the detrimental effects of parental obsession, industrialism, poverty and other topics on child characters in those eras. Murphy spoke to faculty and graduate students in the University at Albany’s Psychology Department, Ph.D. Program in Educational Psychology and Methodology in November.

University Press of America has published the latest book by Peter Heinegg, professor of English, Abraham's Ashes: The Absurdity of Monotheism? The book argues that the "Abrahamic" religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam, in their own but related ways, are irrational, narcissistic, patriarchal fantasies.

Kristin A. Bidoshi, associate professor of Russian, presented a paper, “Uncle Ivan meets the Avatar: Teaching Russian Verbs of Motion Online,” at the annual American Association of Teachers of Slavic and East European Languages and Literatures (AATSEEL) conference in Boston this month. The paper is based on pedagogical research she is conducting for her Department of Education grant. Bidoshi also serves as the head of the Theory, Central/Eastern European Literature and Special Topics Division for the AATSEEL Conference Program Committee.

On Jan. 3, Andrew Burkett, assistant professor of English, participated in a panel discussion for PBS-WMHT on the popular series Downton Abbey, at WMHT's studio in Troy. Burkett talked about his new course this winter term, "Manor House: British Manor Life in Fiction & Film." He addressed potential causes for the public fascination with the series and situated Downton Abbey in relation to the genre of manor house literature, and especially in relation to texts such as Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited, Kazuo Ishiguro's The Remains of the Day, E.M. Forster's Howards End and Sarah Waters' The Little Stranger.