Campus Diversity & Inclusion

Bias

Policy Prohibiting Bias Acts

Union College is committed to providing a safe living and learning environment in which every person is valued and respected, inclusion is assured, and free expression and debate are encouraged. The College accepts the task of educating the next generation of leaders to understand and appreciate the ideas and opinions generated by an increasingly global community. This policy establishes a mechanism for addressing situations involving a real or perceived bias act. In such an instance, the College desires to proceed thoughtfully, providing support to all of those affected, while also affirming that Union values differences, free expression, and debate as sources of strength for the College community.

Definitions

  • Bias

    A conscious or unconscious preference for or prejudice against a person or group of people, motivated in whole or in part an actual or perceived aspect of diversity, including, but not limited to, age, ancestry or ethnicity, color, creed, disability, gender, gender identity or expression, height, immigration or citizenship status, marital status, national origin, race, religion, religious practice, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, or weight.

  • Hate Crime

    Under federal, state, and local laws, a hate crime is defined as any criminal offense or attempted criminal offense that one could reasonably and prudently conclude is motivated, in whole or in part, by the alleged offender’s bias against an individual’s actual or perceived age, ancestry or ethnicity, color, creed, disability, gender, gender identity or expression, height, immigration or citizenship status, marital status, national origin, race, religion, religious practice, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, or weight.

  • Incident of Bias

    Under Union’s specific definition, a bias incident is action taken that one could reasonably and prudently conclude is motivated, in whole or in part, by the alleged offender’s bias against an actual or perceived aspect of diversity, including, but not limited to, age, ancestry or ethnicity, color, creed, disability, gender, gender identity or expression, height, immigration or citizenship status, marital status, national origin, race, religion, religious practice, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, or weight.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Is there a difference between an incident of bias and a hate crime?

    While all hate crimes are forms of bias acts, not all bias acts are hate crimes. A bias act is conduct that is prohibited by our institutional policies, whereas a “hate crime” refers to any criminal activity that is motivated by bias. For example, writing a racial slur on a white board would be considered a bias act at the College, but would not be considered a hate crime since the conduct itself is not inherently criminal in nature (i.e. writing on a white board is not, in and of itself, a crime).

  • Will I be told the outcome of a bias incident report that I make?

    If you are the individual who was targeted by the bias act, you have the right to know the outcome of the investigation. If you made the report as a witness or are asked to participate in the investigation as a witness, you are not entitled to know the outcome. Both the person who experienced an act of bias and the person alleged of bias acts are entitled to have their student or employee records kept confidential. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is a federal law that prohibits institutions from sharing identifying information from confidential records, including disciplinary records.

  • Are bias incidents reported out to the College community?

    Campus Safety is responsible for issuing a Campus Crime Alert when a crime is reported to or brought to the attention of the Campus Safety or other campus security authorities and that crime represents a serious or ongoing threat to the safety of members of the campus community. If there is not an ongoing threat to the safety of members of the campus community, the community is not notified at-large.

  • Is the BASE Team involved in the investigation or adjudication of bias reports?

    No, the BASE Team as a unit is not involved in the investigation or adjudication of bias reports. The Director of Equal Opportunity, who sits on the BASE Team, is the only individual from the BASE Team involved in adjudication matters involving employees and the Director of Community Standards is the only member of the BASE Team involved in matters involving students. Reports of bias that are made or matters that are adjudicated are not shared with the BASE Team.

  • What is the College's procedure for investigating bias incidents that are reported?

    The procedures governing student misconduct or acts of bias can be found in the Student Handbook’s Policy Prohibiting Bias Acts. Procedures governing employee misconduct or acts of bias can be found the in Policy Prohibiting Discrimination, Harassment, Bias and Retaliation in Employment.

  • I am not sure if what I witnessed was considered a bias act. Should I still file a report?

    Yes, all reports that are received by the College are evaluated through an intake process. If the College identifies that the conduct reported is a form of misconduct but is not a violation of our bias policy, the reported will be appropriately reallocated. Further, just because conduct may not be a violation of our institutional policy does not mean it was consistent with our institutional values. Reporting conduct can help support awareness and educational efforts.

  • Can I file a report anonymously?

    If you are an employee who is a supervisor or manager, you cannot file an anonymous report under New York State’s Supervisor Responsibility Law.

    If you are a student, you can file an anonymous report.

  • Who can I speak with if I have any further questions?

    You can email the BASE team directly.