Publication Date

FLM-303-01: Cinematic Montage (T/TH 10:55AM-12:40PM) (de Seve) (HUM) For beginners to advanced, Cinematic Montage explores the inner workings of fiction and non-fiction films.  What are the elements that create a film’s style or genre?  How is rhythm employed in filming and editing? What are the techniques Hollywood uses to get, as they put it, “butts in seats?” In this class we deconstruct and reconstruct the mechanics of the filmmaking craft as students practice filmmaking elements in fun, weekly assignments.  No prior experience needed. This class is helpful to develop analytical and media-critical tools useful across many majors and increasingly important in the media-connected job market. The course counts toward the 6-course minor in Film Studies.

FLM-321-01: Making the Mockumentary (T/TH 1:55PM-3:40PM) (de Seve) NEW COURSE!  See instructor for details.

FRN-312-01: What is French Cinema? (M/W/F 10:30AM-11:35) (Chilcoat) (LCC,HUM) This course moves from an introduction to earliest examples of French and world cinema, to in-depth study of widely recognized classics of French cinema from 1895-1960, so as to develop an appreciation for the history, genre, particular theme(s) and innovation of each film. Students learn how to talk about, analyze and write about film according to critical, cultural, and technological considerations, in order to determine what if anything is particularly “French” about French cinema. All materials are in French, and assignments will be written in French.

MLT-215-01: What is French Cinema? (M/W/F 10:30AM-11:35) (Chilcoat) (LCC,HUM) This course moves from an introduction to earliest examples of French and world cinema, to in-depth study of widely recognized classics of French cinema from 1895-1960, so as to develop an appreciation for the history, genre, particular theme(s) and innovation of each film. Students learn how to talk about, analyze and write about film according to critical, cultural, and technological considerations, in order to determine what if anything is particularly “French” about French cinema.

GSW-495-01/PSC-434-01: Feminist Film (TH 1:55-4:45PM) (Marso) (WAC) In this class, we read the 2011 translation of the 1949 classic and pioneering feminist text, The Second Sex by Simone de Beauvoir to aid us in our reading and analysis of several films by three contemporary French feminist directors.  The Second Sex is credited with inspiring women’s movements and feminist consciousness around the world, and is the foundation for understanding contemporary feminist theory.  The Second Sex as film text helps us identify themes, techniques and formal/narrative structures in films by Chantal Akerman, Catherine Breillat, and Agnes Varda.

GER-339-01/MLT-339-01: The Holocaust in Film (T/TH 10:55AM-12:40PM) (Ricci-Bell) (LCC,HUM) The course examines cinematic representations of the Holocaust in the films of German, German-Jewish, and other European filmmakers. Comparing and contrasting a variety of film genres and cinematic techniques, we explore fundamental questions about the relationships between art and history, representation and experience and memory and responsibility. By considering theoretical and historical readings as well, we situate the films within significant intellectual and historical contexts. Prerequisite (for GER 339 only): GER 201  or permission of the instructor.

EGL 255  Asian American Lit & Film MWF 11:45-12:50  (Tuon) (HUL, HUM, LCC, WAC). If you are interested in the diverse history of Asian immigration in the U.S., take this course.  Together as a class, we will examine major historical moments in Asian America: the first wave of Asian immigration in the mid-nineteenth century, the anti-Asian laws of the late nineteenth century, the Japanese internment during the Second World War, the emergence of Asian American studies during the 1960s Civil Rights Movement, Southeast Asian refugees after the Viet Nam/American War, and the contemporary turns to the transnational and the pan ethnic.  To cover these historical moments, we will read the following texts: Island: Poetry and History of Chinese Immigrants on Angel Island, Eat a Bowl of Tea, Farwell to Manzanar, When Broken Glass Floats, Jazz at Manzanar, American Born Chinese, and American Son. Prerequisite(s): EGL 100 or EGL 101 or EGL 102 or a grade of 5 on the AP English Literature or Language test.

AVA-120-01: Photography 1 (T/TH 9:30AM-12:30PM) (Benjamin) (HUM) A course in black and white silver halide film and gelatin silver printing. Students learn the basics of the art’s aesthetics, the camera, processing, printing, and evaluation/assessment of photographic prints. Three separate projects lead students through making their own photographic prints in various themes and genres of contemporary fine art photography. Students study important works in photography that relate to each project and have critiques of their work. A 35mm film camera with a light meter and adjustable focus is required. Limited enrollment, by permission of instructor.

AVA-220-01: Photography 2 (T/TH 2:00PM-5:00PM) (Benjamin) (HUM) This class experience is two-fold. The first half involves advanced black and white film/chemistry/printing that encourages a refinement of technique and increased sophistication of aesthetics and ideas. The second half involves color digital photography, learning the basics of Photoshop® editing software as used by photographers. Students do “Language of Photography” projects and make printed portfolios. Prerequisite(s): AVA 120; limited enrollment, by permission of the instructor.

ATH-117-01: Stage Lighting Design (T/TH 10:55AM-12:40PM) (Bovard) (HUM) This course seeks to introduce students to the world of stage lighting design and technology. Initial emphasis will be on electrical theory, photometrics and the wide variety of fixtures and control boards in use in the modern theater. The class will then progress to basic lighting theory and analysis of lighting techniques. In the final weeks, the class will actively participate in the design, hang, focus and programming of the lighting for a departmental production.  Note: Satisfies design requirements for Theatre Majors and Minors.