Drilling Deep: A 'day off'

Layers of sediment from the bottom of Lake Junín, at an elevation of 13,000 feet in the Peruvian Andes, hold the record of climate change as far back as 200,000 years.
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Drilling Deep: A 'day off'


Rodbell at the Huayllay Rock Forest National Sanctuary.


  Five days in Peru

What do geologists do on a “day off?” They go look at rocks. While the project at Lake Junín awaited a repair on the boat that would tow the drilling rig in place, Prof. Don Rodbell led a group to investigate the Huayllay Rock Forest National Sanctuary. The spectacular volcanic rock towers look otherworldly. For those who normally breathe the air in Schenectady, the thin air at 14,500 feet made a four-mile hike a strenuous activity.