Drilling Deep: Five days in Peru

Layers of sediment from the bottom of Lake Junín, at an elevation of 13,000 feet in the Peruvian Andes, hold the record of climate change as far back as 200,000 years.
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Drilling Deep: Five days in Peru


Lake Junín is a large, shallow lake circled by shoreline marshes. Despite contamination from nearby mines, it is the habitat for a number of birds: flamingos (seen here) and the endangered Junín Grebe and Junín Rail.


Layers of sediment from the bottom of Lake Junín, at an elevation of 13,000 feet in the Peruvian Andes, hold the record of climate change as far back as 200,000 years. In the summer of 2015, Don Rodbell, professor of geology at Union College, led an international team of 30 paleoclimatologists and students who set out to answer some urgent questions about Earth’s climate history.

To read the story, click here.

Monday, July 27, 2015 -- The road to the Andes

Tuesday, July 28, 2015 -- A 'day off'

Wednesday, July 29, 2015 -- The launch

Thursday, July 30, 2015 -- A long tow and finally some mud

Friday, July 31, 2015