Drilling Deep: Friday, July 31, 2015

Layers of sediment from the bottom of Lake Junín, at an elevation of 13,000 feet in the Peruvian Andes, hold the record of climate change as far back as 200,000 years.
Nott Memorial
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Drilling Deep: Friday, July 31, 2015


  • Coring around the clock, after sundown the lights come on as drillers lift another section of casing.Coring around the clock, after sundown the lights come on as drillers lift another section of casing.
  • Cores are processed in the temporary lab set up at the Tarma hotel.Cores are processed in the temporary lab set up at the Tarma hotel.
  • From Lake Junín, sunset on July 31, 2015 over the jagged peaks of Huayllay National Park, center, and the Cordillera Huayhuash, right.From Lake Junín, sunset on July 31, 2015 over the jagged peaks of Huayllay National Park, center, and the Cordillera Huayhuash, right.
  • Flying the Union flag.Flying the Union flag.

  Five days in Peru

On the second full day of coring, the drillers and scientists had found a rhythm and were moving fast. They quickly passed the previous mark of several meters that Rodbell and his students had extracted almost 20 years ago with a hand coring device. Near the end of the day, 55 meters below the lake bottom, the gray clay from a glacial period suddenly gave way to dark brown peat, exciting evidence that at one point the lake had dried out.